A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Have your say on today's Aardvark Daily column

A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby aardvark_admin » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:35 am

This column is archived at: http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2017/0817.shtml

Can you believe that a 4K RAM board cost NZ$1,000 back in 1977?

Were you even in computers way back then?

If you're a relative noob (ie: born into the Windows world), what do you think of the stuff in those early issues of Byte... especially the ads and the prices?

If you were around back then, did you have any idea that the price of memory (and everything else) would fall so much or that we'd be walking around with computers in our pockets that are many times faster than even the most expensive supercomputer from the 1970s was?

If this is what we can achieve in 4 short decades, what does the future hold?
aardvark_admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2694
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 2:10 pm

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby phill » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:53 am

for those interested
from wiki

Halt and Catch Fire is an American period drama television series created by Christopher Cantwell and Christopher C. Rogers that premiered on AMC on June 1, 2014.[1][2] The series depicts a fictionalized insider's view of the personal computer revolution of the 1980s and later the growth of the World Wide Web in the early 1990s.[3] The series' first two seasons are set in the Silicon Prairie of Dallas–Fort Worth, while the third season is set in Silicon Valley.[4][5] The show's title refers to computer machine code instruction HCF, the execution of which would cause the computer's central processing unit to stop working ("catch fire" was a humorous exaggeration).[6]

In August 2014, AMC renewed Halt and Catch Fire for a second season,[7] which premiered on May 31, 2015 and concluded on August 2, 2015.[8] In October 2015, AMC renewed the series for a 10-episode third season,[9] with the first episode airing on August 21, 2016,[10] ahead of the two-hour season premiere on August 23, 2016.[11] AMC renewed Halt and Catch Fire for a fourth and final season of 10 episodes on October 10, 2016.[12] The final season is scheduled to begin with a two-hour premiere on August 19, 2017.[3]
( 9 episodes found )
being a( n alleged ) binge watcher i will likely start around mid october
Last edited by phill on Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
phill
 
Posts: 1247
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 8:31 pm

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby goosemoose » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:55 am

Ha. Nostalgia. I'm living it now. I needed a simple system to enter and record data with simple changes. The easiest language I found for doing this was COBOL - GnuCOBOL to be exact. Just a couple of simple green screen entry screens and I'm away. And what a breeze and joy it was. No OOP or libraries needed to this and that, just a simple program. How things have changed and yet stayed the same.
goosemoose
 
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 1:05 pm

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby par_annoyed » Thu Aug 17, 2017 11:32 am

The rate of change is simply stunning - I don't have the adjectives.
I've said this before in this blog - stuff like disc drives to micro SD cards, which must represent BILLIONS of times smaller, and from the humble single transistor to 10nm CPUs with millions of them in a square mm. Only for 60 years of the transistor......that pace affects EVERYTHING.

If we manage not to incinerate the planet and ourselves with it (and there's already lots of easy ways available), this pace of change makes any future guesses fall into the realm of sci-fi.
will we find out we are just a computer simulation ? will we finally invent the wormhole ? or fusion energy ? will [man made] climate change actually be real ?
Or will mankind go 1984 and become a planet of subservient morons being watched every single second of their lives ??
Cyborgs ? Terminator ?
Honestly, I reckon they are all possible, and roughly about the same probability.

When you watch some of the older 'tech'/sci-fi movies, ignoring the special effects but including the sets, It's interesting that some have hardly aged at all, and others look horribly dated.
That's even before we get into Hollywood's various versions of IT, which is laughable...

Me ? I still use 'C'. no NOT C++. Real dangerous original 'C' with lots of pointers (void*) and casts and very powerful, and you can STUFF all your clever classes and methods and object oriented garbage and <rant removed>...
Yes, I'm OLD. I remember assembly language and can add up in hexadecimal too.
I also still smile at "There are 10 types of people who understand binary..."

So there...
par_annoyed
 
Posts: 545
Joined: Sat Oct 18, 2014 8:03 am

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby Muscular Jam » Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:08 pm

par_annoyed wrote:I also still smile at "There are 10 types of people who understand binary..."
I think you might have meant "There are 10 types of people in the world: those who understand binary and those who don't."
Muscular Jam
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:09 pm

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby Weasel » Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:31 pm

There will always be people tinkering in their garages virtual or otherwise. Saying that its over, is like the patent office announcing that everything had been invented and closed for a while. Occasionally someone will connect the dots and realize something new, that turns into the next big thing.
Weasel
 
Posts: 182
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2015 10:44 am

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby GSVNoFixedAbode » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:32 am

Not sure if optical processing will be the next big thing or if it'll be overtaken by quantum computing. Both will be another step-shift in computing power. Combine that with holo displays and we'll move away from 'computers' into integrated computing as part of most things we do (IoT objects/clothing/etc).
Meanwhile I have fond memories of paying $2000 for a BBC B micro, with 64k memory and a cassette player for storage. Then another $(God knows!) for a SSSD disk, and a [fanfare]Sideways ROM board thanks to veroboard, soldering iron, and 'Everyday Electronics' mag. :D
GSVNoFixedAbode
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 8:53 am

Re: A trip down (very expensive) memory lane (17 Aug, 2017)

Postby Grumpy » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:33 pm

goosemoose wrote:Ha. Nostalgia. I'm living it now. I needed a simple system to enter and record data with simple changes. The easiest language I found for doing this was COBOL - GnuCOBOL to be exact. Just a couple of simple green screen entry screens and I'm away. And what a breeze and joy it was. No OOP or libraries needed to this and that, just a simple program. How things have changed and yet stayed the same.


True, true... I started cutting code in Cobol in 1963 with all those horrible stacks of punched cards you dared not DROP!
User avatar
Grumpy
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 12:18 pm


Return to Today's column

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests