Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

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Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby aardvark_admin » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:32 am

This column is archived at: https://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2018/0208.shtml

Who'd have thought that using dim bulbs could make you one?

What levels of lighting do you use in your home and your work areas, especially during the long nights and duller days of winter?

Might this research deliver some useful treatments for diseases of cognitive decline such as Alzheimer's and the like?

Could it be worth you doubling the lumen-level in your home for a few months and see if you notice any difference in your mood or intellectual performance?
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Re: Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby latewings » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:04 am

A slight off-topic but still pertinent, especially to those of use who spend a lot of time at the keyboard coalface is the blue light circadian effect on melatonin and it's effect on sleep.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side

I have quite a few devices that require charging overnight and for some reason the use of blue LEDs is rife. It would be far more practical (and cheaper I expect) to use the same specification of red LED, which to our eyes would not appear as bright, but still perform the indicating function required.

In my house I've replaced the 100w incandescent bulbs with 50w halogens as I prefer the whiter light from them, that and they tend to last longer than the filament Edison style photon emitters. I also have a couple of solar tubes that capture daylight into the internal rooms. They're great during lightning storms as an added bonus.
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Re: Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby Perry » Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:32 am

Brighter the better! (Within reason)

Long ago, there was a study that dealt with light in slightly unusual aspects of illumination for night-time workers.

I dimly recall that lead sleeves were put around the anode and cathode ends of fluoro tubes and UV and IR bulbs were installed. The measurable effects included better health and less absenteeism.

I think that we often get things wrong when dealing with 'light' matters.

Like the return of Rickets to NZ consequent upon all the paranoia of slip, splap, slop and childrens's playground festooned with shade sails.
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Re: Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby Muscular Jam » Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:30 pm

aardvark_admin wrote:One also can't help but wonder whether sleeping with the light on may have some (any) effect.
Yep, a bad one.
Some studies suggest a link between exposure to light at night, such as working the night shift, to some types of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. That's not proof that nighttime light exposure causes these conditions; nor is it clear why it could be bad for us. But we do know that exposure to light suppresses the secretion of melatonin, a hormone that influences circadian rhythms, and there's some experimental evidence (it's very preliminary) that lower melatonin levels might explain the association with cancer. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side
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Re: Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby Greg » Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:19 pm

Muscular Jam wrote:
aardvark_admin wrote:One also can't help but wonder whether sleeping with the light on may have some (any) effect.
Yep, a bad one.
Some studies suggest a link between exposure to light at night, such as working the night shift, to some types of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. That's not proof that nighttime light exposure causes these conditions; nor is it clear why it could be bad for us. But we do know that exposure to light suppresses the secretion of melatonin, a hormone that influences circadian rhythms, and there's some experimental evidence (it's very preliminary) that lower melatonin levels might explain the association with cancer. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side

Hmm. I feel entirely uncomfortable without having at least some light source on when I sleep at night. Dunno if its some sort of insecurity, but I always have my led torch with me no matter where I go so I can put it on when away from home, at a mid-light setting.
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Re: Are you a dim-bulb? (7 Feb, 2018)

Postby Weasel » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:56 am

This is interesting. The tech company I work at - a good percentage of the software nerds and product support team work in darkened or dimly lit rooms.

Personally I hate dimly lit rooms, so much so that even during the day at home I'll have lights on.
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