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Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 4:57 pm
by Kiwiiano
Malcolm wrote:I don't know how a swap will go given that a 40kWH battery pack is going to be on the order of 200KG.
Also I think there are concerns over how the average motorist will handle connecting/disconnecting a high voltage DC power source. Usually it isn't something they will let the general public near and have special certifications for handling such things.

Presumably you swing into the service station, the attendant opens the flap below the boot lid, slides the battery out onto a trolley, pushes it over to the charging bay, picks up the replacement, slides it into your car where it connects in a larger version of your digital camera battery connector and closes the flap. Cha-Ching!!

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 5:26 pm
by gregmcc
There may be enough generation capacity for EV's but that is where it end, the infrastructure just isn't there.

Your typical slow EV charger is a 16A beast, that's 3.7kw, a fast charger double that, 7.4kw - that's like having another electric stove running.

Your typical house mains would not be big enough to support the additional load, and if you and your neighbours all got EV's the transformer in your area would not be big enough, let alone the overhead or underground lines that service your area, and from there the problem only gets bigger......

There would have to be a massively big investment in the electrical system, where is this money going to come from.......sounds like it's time for another tax to help pay for this......

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 5:31 pm
by aardvark_admin
But we should be focused on "commuter EVs" which use a smaller pack and they can be installed by simply parking in the provided space, whereupon the little man comes out with a trolley, puts it under your car, presses the requisite buttons and then wheels the (now freed) old battery away. In seconds, he returns with a new battery on a trolley -- slides it under your car and presses more buttons to instal it into your chasis.

Simple, quick and foolproof. Remember -- we don't require people to under dangerous-goods training to handle petrol, four litres of which has more explosive energy than a stick of dynamite :-)

These things can be designed as to be foolproof (in much the same way we play with lethal mains voltages all day by way of plugs and sockets) and the IP associated with designing a good system would be quite exportable (me thinks).

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 6:31 pm
by Muscular Jam
ffirman wrote:the increase in power would make home solar and battery storage worth doing.
yep. I work in a solar powered building and I've often thought about putting panels on my north facing garage roof. However the hassle of getting it hooked up to the house where the energy is actually needed has put me off. But if my garage can charge batteries which then charge a car I reckon it'd be worth doing. I've also been looking at getting an ebike for most of my work commute. Top speed seems to be about 25km/h, and my average commute speed is constantly dropping so soon it will be around that figure.

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 9:31 pm
by joeseph
Malcolm wrote:I don't know how a swap will go given that a 40kWH battery pack is going to be on the order of 200KG.
Also I think there are concerns over how the average motorist will handle connecting/disconnecting a high voltage DC power source. Usually it isn't something they will let the general public near and have special certifications for handling such things.


The general public don't seem to have any trouble plugging in 230V mains stuff (with short circuit current of quite a few amps) the unit just has to be designed correctly to be inherently safe.
You can't always engineer for stupidity, granted, but the Darwin awards aren't given out to just anybody!

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 10:00 pm
by psycik
I think the only way it would work would be with robotics over a channel

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 11:02 pm
by flyernzl
Right now the operating cost of EVs is artificially suppressed - unlike every other vehicle on the road they pay no road user tax.

However this cannot last. If 'everyone' changed over to EVs then obviously the Government would need to tax these vehicles as well in order to keep the road funding kitty topped up.

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 8:55 am
by hagfish
A little man with a trolley

No - for the same reason that we don't buy petrol in buckets, there will never be 'a little man with a trolley'! :lol: It will be a 90-second swap-out, completely automated, and your taxi will continue on its merry way. And there will be an auxiliary battery to make sure your air-con stays on and your wi-fi node stays up. Little man with a trolley...

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 9:02 am
by psycik
flyernzl wrote:Right now the operating cost of EVs is artificially suppressed - unlike every other vehicle on the road they pay no road user tax.

However this cannot last. If 'everyone' changed over to EVs then obviously the Government would need to tax these vehicles as well in order to keep the road funding kitty topped up.


yeah, but it's never going to equal the cost of Gas. People chuck this argument up as a barrier, but I doubt anyone is buying a 60-90k EV and thinking "yeah no road users, this is so cheap".

Re: Why EVs might cripple New Zealand (23 May, 2018)

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 9:32 am
by phill
if we use the ev;s we need rather than the penis substitutes we are brainwashed into buying
road user charges when they come should be substantially lower than for ice vehicles

for the reason that ...
they dont tear up the road anywhere near as much
they wont weigh 2 tonne ( musk's abortionate pos not withstanding )
and they dont drop tar dissolving oils and fuels

so the ( at this point very rare ) roads made properly wont need relaying anywhere near as often