The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

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The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby aardvark_admin » Mon Nov 10, 2014 8:50 am

This column is archived at: http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2014/1110.shtml

Is there no end to the increase in capacity and the number of bytes worth of storage you can buy for a dollar?

When I started making microcomputers, 4GB of memory would have cost $10 million but today, it's a tiny fraction of that and considered an entry-level capacity for most computers.

Let's hear your predictions for the capacity and cost of memory and non-volatile storage in another 10 years' time and we'll see who gets it right.
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby RoddyAxn » Mon Nov 10, 2014 9:37 am

Prediction.

As 10^10 population gain hand held storage devices, heading to 2050, that can interact with each other, wirelessly, an emergence of what we observed with tape recorder digital storage devices paradigm emerges.

For what purpose is Moore's law enacting then becomes the question.

I would suggest learning to speak English and be feed (or is this language too treacherous in than annals of the past to be trusted?) and also support those that understand thorium power when electing good characters to elected offices.

So ten years from now.

EMP (electro magnetic pulse) need faraday cages to shield our digital storage and retrieval devices today.

Otherwise the reverse of moore's law.

EMP can come from the sun, space or human cognition.

Then our power grid is out.

10 years from now and the global brain will be far more developed.
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby par_annoyed » Mon Nov 10, 2014 11:24 am

Like you Bruce, I can remember the very early days of commercial computers too, and how expensive the RAM storage was - in the cabinets, I remember seeing actual Ferrite core store memory boards in use, at 4K a board. That's around 30 years ago - Wow, that's not really all that long ago.

We used to think that a 20MB disc was big, then before we know it, we are at 1 GB, and now 1TB units of storage. The pace of change is truly amazing. The packing density of hardware chips has gone the same way.

I do wonder (and read articles) whther we are truly approaching the physical molecular limits of both chip manufacture and magnetic 'domain' sizes for discs, and I suspect that the increase rates will flatten out. But then this has been said before many times, and a new trick or technology comes along, and again we rise steeply with the new methods.

So I think it's impossible to predict where it will go, but I think in 10 or 20 years the technology will be as unrecogniseable as say a DVD would be if sent back in time to 1980. Will we have semi-organic memory and logic gates ? LEDS are using organic compounds now (apparently), so it's got to be possible.

Will we have single molecule logic gates ?? Will IBM get carbon nanotubes into mainstream manufacture ?? I wish I knew !!
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby aardvark_admin » Mon Nov 10, 2014 3:31 pm

par_annoyed wrote:Like you Bruce, I can remember the very early days of commercial computers too, and how expensive the RAM storage was - in the cabinets, I remember seeing actual Ferrite core store memory boards in use, at 4K a board. That's around 30 years ago - Wow, that's not really all that long ago.

If you haven't already seen them already, you might find these videos I've made somewhat interesting:

Magnetic core memory
Delayline memory

Just a bit of technostagia ;-)
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby roygbiv » Mon Nov 10, 2014 8:04 pm

I can remember being absolutely gobsmacked by a 500MB hard drive in a PC, thinking what the hell can you use all that storage for !!!

Nowadays, it is a well known fact that 'spinny' HDD erformance has only marginally improved in the last 10-15 years, what has improved is the density - 4TB disks are fairly common. But, on the performance side SDDs are getting price competitive with HDDs, flash memory is the latest. One vendor (NetApp) has gone as far as saying that by 2017 flash will be cheaper than SAS HDDs.
The biggest challenge is managing all that data, even at home trying to catalogue all the digital photos you have taken needs some management, or music (MP3) collections. There is always "Cloud" for storage but it does carry the risk of losing everything if your cloud provider is not up to scratch eg. Megaupload as run by the big fat german chap.
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby par_annoyed » Tue Nov 11, 2014 10:50 am

aardvark_admin wrote:If you haven't already seen them already, you might find these videos I've made somewhat interesting:
Magnetic core memory
Delayline memory
Just a bit of technostagia ;-)


Ah, happier times.... I worked on a Ferranti Argus 600 for a while when much younger - one coded the bootstrap program (a punch tape reader) BY HAND from switches on the front panel !! My God things have changed fast.

I remember my Grandad telling me, that in his lifetime, mankind went from the horse and cart to the Jumbo Jet, putting a man on the moon, and nuclear power. (1896-1978). Amazing.
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Re: The demand for more storage (11 Nov, 2014)

Postby George Tyler » Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:16 pm

par_annoyed wrote:
aardvark_admin wrote:If you haven't already seen them already, you might find these videos I've made somewhat interesting:
Magnetic core memory
Delayline memory
Just a bit of technostagia ;-)


Ah, happier times.... I worked on a Ferranti Argus 600 for a while when much younger - one coded the bootstrap program (a punch tape reader) BY HAND from switches on the front panel !! My God things have changed fast.

I remember my Grandad telling me, that in his lifetime, mankind went from the horse and cart to the Jumbo Jet, putting a man on the moon, and nuclear power. (1896-1978). Amazing.


Ye, first computer I worked on was made by ITT, 32K memory, 20MHz clock. Cpu was 32 cards with ttl logic IC's, one card per bit. It ran a letter sorting machine that took one floor of a building that occupied a city block.
if it crashed, we also had to enter a boot program from front panel toggle switches, then load a paper tape bootloader, then a big real of paper tape for the main program. No VDU at all, to enter data there was a teletype machine.... around 1976. learnt programming on that, it was really good experience.
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