3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

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3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby enerider » Sun Sep 21, 2014 12:39 am

Oh yay, we get the Blue team for another term, in even greater numbers.

Time to prepare for a whole lot more everything being sold off.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby aardvark_admin » Sun Sep 21, 2014 7:38 am

Yeah I have to say that I am very depressed today.

NZ has just basically given JK a mandate to embrace more US control of our laws and more US surveillance of our people.

Every Kiwi now has a big "kick me" sign stuck on their back and you can bet that the government will take full advantage of that.

It would appear that we care not for our privacy, our sovereignty or our rights as a people.

Maybe sometime soon Kiwis will wake up and realise that we need to change the system (insert plug for Recoverable Proxy here) so that no matter which party is in power, the people have the ultimate power of veto over their actions (as would have prevented the sale of assets and the passage of some of the spying legislation).

People in power will always be corrupted by that power -- so let's ensure that the system includes checks and balances to ensure that such corruption can be limited or avoided by order of the people at large.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby goosemoose » Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:52 am

Had to happen though, brand key and his down to earth style appealed to your average punter. Can't wait for the TPP to be signed in the next few weeks. Significantly watered down and with our trousers further down around our ankles, and the farmers to rock up to the US and try to sell their wares only to be told to sod off, it don't work like that sunshine, not until 2030 anyway. And BTW you HAVE to buy our wares NOW. They'll still support national though because, well, thats what they've always done.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby aardvark_admin » Sun Sep 21, 2014 11:36 am

Yes, just wait until the "3 for $20" racks of DVDs at The Warehouse disappear and suddenly, all the "brand name" consumer electronics cost twice as much due to the outlawing of parallel imports -- then (and only then) will we see the great unwashed take an interest.

Of course those who currently watch NetFlix via VPNs or "globalising" services will aso suddenly discover that this too qualifies as a "parallel import" so will have no alternative but to sign up to SkyTV's inordinately overpriced offerings again. Then, and only then, might we see rioting in the streets.

And don't think you'll be able to simply download your TV via P2P networks -- because the GCSB and the NSA will be watching your *every* move and the new draconian sanctions that will apply to copyright infringements would see anyone who tries, bankrupted -- as the US government pings you hundreds of thousands of dollars for each infringement.

Yep, as I said... we've just stuck a huge "kick me" sign on our backs and are about to get our arses well and truly bruised.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby Screw » Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:21 am

Seeing another Cult of John get back in was no surprise to me but getting over the MMP hump was.

Labour needs to get back to it's grassroot support (low income earners and the poor) instead of trying hard to be Gnatlite. That way there would be a clear choice for people to vote for. Firstly by reinstating the Unions, love 'em or hate 'em, they make sure that the profits are shared across the economy. The Unions were their traditional financiers, as it is now Labour must get it's funding from the same sources as National, so their policies are so similar as to be identical.

We also need a media that is completely independent and not reliant on ratings and profits. For a democracy to work the people must be fully informed.

ACT made me laugh in derision, the party of "Self-reliance and Hard Work", no 'Hand-outs' has to get a big hand-out from the Gnats to stay in!
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby aardvark_admin » Mon Sep 22, 2014 2:48 pm

Screw wrote:ACT made me laugh in derision, the party of "Self-reliance and Hard Work", no 'Hand-outs' has to get a big hand-out from the Gnats to stay in!

You were surprised? Hypocrisy is the unspoken mantra of all politicians.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby Screw » Tue Sep 23, 2014 1:56 pm

No not surprised Bruce, seen it before. Just thought it needed a mention.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby Malcolm » Tue Sep 23, 2014 2:14 pm

And now Act is being gifted a ministerial post, just so they can get some tax-payer money to spend on party business.
National changed the rules in 2008 to allow them to do this.
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby Screw » Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:53 pm

Yep Malc. They did. All good fun eh?
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Re: 3 more years? NZ is very clearly demented

Postby Screw » Tue Sep 23, 2014 11:04 pm

I scanned this from the local rag! Posted in toto.

No one should begrudge John Key and the National party the right to celebrate an impressive election victory. It is little consolation to those who opposed them that the win is very much a personal triumph for the Prime Minister rather than for the party and government he leads.

As the tumult and the shouting die away, however, and there is time for more mature reflection, we can register a number of reasons as to why even the victors might feel a sense of unease about the outcome.

The triumphalism in some parts of the media would have us believe that everybody loves John Key and that the country is united behind him. Let us simply observe, as an antidote to such an illusion, that only one in three of eligible voters actually voted National; more than 60% of us did not join the bandwagon.

John Key himself, in his warning to his colleagues that they are not to show any arrogance, seems to understand this very well.

It will quickly be observed that other parties, and particularly Labour, did much worse. Agreed – they certainly have their own problems, but that is not the particular point I am making.

A democratic political process in which nearly a third do not participate is not in good health – especially in a country with a traditionally enviable record in terms of voter turnout.

We need to know who the nearly one million eligible voters who did not vote are, and why they stayed at home on polling day. It is not good enough for the rest of us to say that it was up to them and that, if they couldn’t be bothered, they have only themselves to blame.

We know, of course, who did make it to the polls. They identified themselves as soon as the election result became clear. They certainly included those who – against the wishes of the majority of Kiwis – bought shares in the partly privatised electricity companies and who immediately celebrated a surge in the value of their shareholdings.

It is a reasonable assumption that it also included others who saw their other shareholdings and other financial assets elsewhere immediately rise in value after the election. And those who have seen the value of their houses go up week by week, especially in Auckland, by more than some of our fellow-citizens can earn in six months – and those with good jobs and incomes, able to afford foreign holidays and fees at private schools for their children – they will also have had good reason to get to vote in favour of continuing and extending the good times represented by the status quo.

They all knew very clearly what they were voting for and had good reason to do so. But why did the nearly one million non-voters stay at home? Did they not have an even stronger reason to vote?

We have a pretty good idea of who the non-voters were. They were poor, often unemployed, poorly educated, with worse health than the rest of us, often brown-skinned, living in sub-standard housing and bringing up their children in poverty.

Did they not have everything to gain from change – a change that would not leave them languishing and invisible and falling further behind while the triumphant one in three amongst us celebrated their victory?

Why did they not do at least something to ward off the changes promised by a re-elected National government? Are they really content with the prospect of a next three years that will see their rights at work severely curtailed, that will mean their being “moved off benefits”, that will produce further cuts in the public services on which they especially depend?

The answer to these questions is disarmingly simple – but should nonetheless be of fundamental concern to all those who care about our country. They did not vote because they did not see the point.

They had no confidence that the political process took any account of their interests. They had ceased to believe anything that politicians said. They felt disengaged and confused, and convinced that there was nothing they could do to improve matters.

They are the people who are powerless and literally without hope, to whom things are done by faceless forces who have little idea of how life is for them. People who are without hope do not vote. Hopelessness has, in practical terms, disenfranchised them.

The National party might, if they are unwise, treat this with equanimity. But the party with real questions to answer is the Labour party.

How is it that the Labour party has failed to engage with what many would see as their natural constituency? What has led the Labour party to let down a million people who in earlier times would have looked to Labour to defend their interests?

As the entrails of the election are picked over, these are the questions that, for their own sake – but even more for the sake of the disenfranchised and the country as a whole – Labour must now answer. Our country cannot afford to leave so many of our fellow-citizens behind.

Sums it up really well.
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